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Abdominal rigidity

Definition

Abdominal rigidity is stiffness of the muscles in the belly area, which can be felt when touched or pressed.

Alternative Names

Rigidity of the abdomen

Considerations

When there is a sore area inside the belly or abdomen, the pain will get worse when a hand presses against your belly area.

Your fear or nervousness about being touched (palpated) may cause this symptom, but there should be no pain.

If you have pain when you are touched and you tighten the muscles to guard against more pain, it is more likely caused by a physical condition inside your body. The condition may affect one or both sides of your body.

Abdominal rigidity may occur with:

Causes

Causes can include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Get medical care right away if you have pain when the belly is gently pressed and then released.

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

You will probably be seen in an emergency room.

The health care provider will examine you. This may include a pelvic exam, and possibly a rectal exam.

The provider will ask questions about your symptoms, such as:

  • When did they first start?
  • What other symptoms do you have at the same time? For example, do you have abdominal pain?

You may have the following tests:

You will probably not be given any pain relievers until a diagnosis is made. Pain relievers can hide your symptoms.

References

McQuaid K. Approach to the patient with gastrointestinal disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 132.

Squires R, Carter SN, Postier RG. Acute abdomen. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox KL, eds. Sabiston Textbook of Surgery. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 45.


Review Date: 10/8/2018
Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
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