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Body mass index

Alternative Names

BMI; Obesity - body mass index; Obesity - BMI; Overweight - body mass index; Overweight - BMI

Information

A good way to decide if your weight is healthy for your height is to figure out your body mass index (BMI). You and your health care provider can use your BMI to estimate how much body fat you have.

Being obese puts strain on your heart and can lead to serious health problems. These include:

HOW TO DETERMINE YOUR BMI

Your BMI estimates how much you should weigh based on your height.

There are many websites with calculators that give your BMI when you enter your weight and height.

You can also calculate it yourself:

  • Multiply your weight in pounds by 703.
  • Divide that answer by your height in inches.
  • Divide that answer by your height in inches again.

For example, a woman who weighs 270 pounds (122 kilograms) and is 68 inches (172 centimeters) tall has a BMI of 41.0.

Use the chart below to see what category your BMI falls into, and whether you need to be concerned about your weight.

Use the chart to see what category your BMI falls into
BMICATEGORY
Below 18.5Underweight
18.5 to 24.9Healthy
25.0 to 29.9Overweight
30.0 to 39.9Obese
Over 40Extreme or high risk obesity

BMI is not always the best way to decide whether you need to lose weight. If you have more or less muscle than is normal, your BMI may not be a perfect measure of how much body fat you have:

  • Body builders. Because muscle weighs more than fat, people who are very muscular may have a high BMI.
  • Elderly. In older adults it is often better to have a BMI between 25 and 27, rather than under 25. If you are older than 65, for example, a slightly higher BMI may help protect you from thinning of the bones (osteoporosis).
  • Children. While many children are obese, DO NOT use this BMI calculator for evaluating a child. Talk to your child's provider about the right weight for your child's age.

Providers use a few methods to decide whether you are overweight. Your provider may also take your waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio into consideration.

Your BMI alone can't predict your health risk, but most experts say that a BMI greater than 30 (obesity) is unhealthy. No matter what your BMI is, exercise can help reduce your risk of heart disease and diabetes. Remember to always talk to your provider before starting an exercise program.

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About adult BMI. CDC.gov. Updated May 15, 2015. www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/adult_bmi/index.html. Accessed July 29, 2016.

Gahagan S. Overweight and obesity. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 47.

Jensen MD. Obesity. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine. 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 220.


Review Date: 7/13/2016
Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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